Our Annual Concert program entitled Songs of Love and Life takes us on a journey through time, back and forth through the decades from the 20s through to the late 90s and beyond.

We open with songs from the swinging sixties, well known songs still popular today and all with a strong vein of humour and good will. It had better be tonight by Henry Mancini from the 1963 film The Pink Panther; the hopeful, optimistic A wonderful world, (1967) made famous by Louis Armstrong; the quirky When I’m 64 (1967) by the Beatles & the makes you wanna dance number – Blame it on the Bossa Nova, a top 10 hit of the time by Edie Gorme

This lively opening bracket will be followed by one with a quieter, more reflective tone with songs from the 80s and 90s. Lullabye (Good night my Angel) by Billy Joel, Perhaps Love by John Denver and Hallelujah by Leonard Cohen, all moving contemplations of love and life.

We also have some classical songs with exquisite close harmonies.  False Love by Edward Elgar, and Three Moravian Duets by Dvorak. Then there are some from way back when – the 20s & 30s and gosh didn’t they do lyrics and melody then – Anything Goes (Cole Porter), 42nd Street (Harry Warren) and Putting on the Ritz (Irving Berlin), all great fun and full of life.

The mood changes yet again and the choir concludes the concert with a traditional spiritual with four handed accompaniment I want Jesus to Walk with Me and lively gospel number A city called Heaven where our soloist Jenna Roubos is accompanied by the choir.

The program from the choir is interspersed with duets – from our pianists, John Atwell and Patrice Marshall playing three Spanish dances by Moritz Moszkowski (19th century composer) and from our soloists Jenna Roubos and Nadia Migliardi who will sing the Flower Duet from Lakme by Delibes. Jenna, our 2015 vocal scholar will also sing Can’t help lovin that man from Showboat.

With each annual concert the Maroondah Singers present a new hot off the press program, where much of the music is new to the choir and being presented for the first time in concert. The challenge of learning many new pieces in a short space of time is balanced by the enjoyment and novelty of bringing such pieces into our repertoire and to our audiences. We love singing such a varied and emotionally rich program. This is truly a program that epitomises the choir’s motto Music is what feelings sound like. Come and enjoy the music.